Perkbox Case Study (Oyster Card Replacement).

Perkbox Case Study (Oyster Card Replacement).

Assumptions and risks (RAID) Level 1 - 5

(RISK) - Priority biggest risk firstRisk Category RR; TR; BR; QR(Assumption) - or risk(Issues) Chance risk occurs (IMPACT 1-5)(Dependencies) - (PROBABILITY 1-5)Overall Risk Value - (IMPACTxPROBABILITY)
2
QR
Assumption or risk B; We believe to create safer travelling conditions.
4
4
16
4
BR
Assumption or risk D; We believe to save both commuters and the Transport system money both short & long-term.
4
4
16
1
QR
Assumption or risk A; We believe to present a better solution to the Oyster card system by saving time.
2
3
9
3
BR
Assumption or risk C; We believe to make commuters lives easier.
3
2
6

Risk Categories

(RISK) - Priority biggest risk first(Assumption) - or riskTime Risk;Resource RiskQuality Risk;Business/Financial Risk;
2
Assumption or risk B; We believe to create safer travelling conditions.
The technology needed and engineering demand to deliver our product.
Not having a team experienced enough to take on the project demands.
Meeting governmental standards and the processing of varying data whilst meeting legal requirements.
Having to increase scope due to the nature and complexity of the product.
4
Assumption or risk D; We believe to save both commuters and the Transport system money both short & long-term.
Covering various markets and vendors for effective payment capabilities could slow the project.
Not having a vast accessibility to payment technologies to scale effectively.
Restriction of payment could narrow our customer base therefore accessibility.
Using third party services could have high cost implications for the business.
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Delimit Phase:
  • define customer segments, regionality and nature of business and indicate level of ambition
  • Delimit /Level Of Ambition

    Delimit Spec.What the nature of your businessCustomersWhat product or service idea to pursueWhat the level of your ambition
    Delimit Spec.
    Geographic; Metropolitan areas in and around London. Demographic; All commuters and transportation users Socio-economic; General Public Behaviour and preferences; Safer Travel
    - Commuters - Travellers - International Travellers - General Public - All ages 16+
    - design and engineering - (project or product) development - financial service
    To provide safer, cost-effective and more accessible solutions for the under and over ground travel pass in and around London.

    Thinks; Sees; Feels; Does

    PersonaThinksSeesFeelsDoes
    [Open User Study] Travellers & Commuters User base; Heavy; Medium; Light User
    I'm always thinking of how to best use my time whilst travelling. (HU)
    I'm observing exit routes and places to leave on first time journeys.
    I feel relatively stressed, especially with the current pandemic.
    I'm checking times on my phone and schedules for my next stop.
    What should I prepare for when I exit... (MU)
    Watching way signs for my exit.
    Pressured from the speed of which I must react.
    Stops to understand and figure a better plan of route.
    Do I have enough credit on my Oyster card... (MU)
    Checks application to see if sufficient.
    Anxiety for the unknown
    Checks bank application to send money to children.
    Has my children got there travel cards... (LU)
    Checks phone to message children to find out.
    Worrying that I haven't remembered to top up the cards.
    Contacts children but doesn't always get an answer.
    How much daily spending do I do whilst travelling... (MU)
    Checks phone to calculate amount for various journeys.
    Frustrated at the idea of not using time effectively.
    Writes and keep track of time for each journey to file receipts for billing.
    How much time do I spend travelling... (HU)
    Figures out mentally and by the watch to make an estimate of time lost.
    Dissatisfied of the idea of loosing precious time for each part of the journey.
    Writes and keep track of time for each journey to file receipts for billing.
    Is there a faster route than the current one... (MU)
    Checks maps in and around the station to better understand other routes from A to B.
    Confused and overwhelmed to understand the mapping system.
    Stops and asks directions and advice from commuters or staff.
    Is the line full and dangerous to travel today... (HU)
    Checks phone to find out but no sufficient information to know.
    Fearful for every journey taken but has no choice.
    Calls friend you travels in advance, but isn't always reliable.
Empathise Phase:

(Customer Discovery) Diverge

Contextual Inquiry_v0.1
Contextual Inquiry_v0.1
Our customers:
  • Who are they; Under and Overground Users
  • What job needs to be done; Ability to pay and travel safely and effectively
  • What are your customers anxieties and desires; Please refer to contextual enquiry document
  • How do we serve their anxieties and desires now; To provide safer, cost-effective and more accessible solutions for the under and over ground travel pass in and around London.
Our Business Environment:
  • What does your business environment look like;
  • image
The problem you want to solve:
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Problem Scenarios

Problem ScenariosCurrent AlternativesOur Value PropositionOur Validated Market Differentiation
Subject; Can't figure out how to best use my time regarding various journey routes to differing locations.
Google Maps offers a service that allows users to view times and stops for differing journeys.
Our application offers the same capabilities with also the added benefit of payment options and travel saving expenditure.
Subject B; Forgotten necessary cards or wallet to pay for the travel service.
Phone payments are easily accessible through the gates.
Our application offers the same capabilities with also the added benefit of payment options and coupons for future journeys.
Our application offers the same capabilities with also the added benefit of payment options and coupons for future journeys for travellers & commuters unlike current market apps
Subject C; Haven't credit on the oyster card
Checks via website
Our application allows users to view current credit, spending and cap capabilities
Subject D; Family members don't have sufficient credit
Can't determine third party credits
Our application will allow third party users to share travel information and spending
Subject E; Don't know daily to monthly spending
Calculates cost of each journey via collected tickets
Our application automatically records and calculates times, routes & costs.
Subject F; Don't know daily, monthly time travelling
Estimates on phone calculator
Our application automatically records and calculates times, routes & costs.
Subject G; Can't figure out fastest possible route.
Speaks with station staff or uses Google Journeys
Our application presents real-time information for best routes depending on various factors i.e works; incidents; traffic; changes; Threat Analysis
Our application presents real-time information for best routes depending on various factors i.e works; incidents; traffic; changes; Threat Analysis for travellers & commuters unlike current market apps
Subject H; Can't determine danger levels for daily travels re; No. of person estimate.
Checks news but unable to find sufficient information
Our application pulls travel usage via all currently using the underground services
Our application pulls travel usage via all currently using the underground services; Threat Analysis for travellers & commuters unlike current market apps
Define Phase:

Define Phase (Differentiation) (Converge)

Current Market Capabilities VS Our Validated Market Differentiation

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IOS App Store customer reviews

Play Store customer reviews

Current Technological & Infrastructure Challenge

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Define Phase (Differentiation)

  • solve the right problem by defining it
  • define the circumstances under which the problem is worth solving
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    Stage_0.2 Verify & Validate Assumptions via UX research.

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    Stage_0.3 Converge To Reframe The Problem

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Ideate Phase:

Design Collaboration; Research Process and Methods Phase (Diverge)

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EXERCISE: FIND CURRENT MARKET SUCCESS & FAILURES TO LEARN FROM Before you start generating ideas based on your design criteria, split into groups for desk research to come up with the six ideas currently on the market.

Design Criteria

AreaSourceReasoning
Criteria Based on Job to be Done
Problem you are solving (from Value Proposition Canvas)
Reasoning
Criteria Based on Customer Experience
(Value Proposition Canvas)
Reasoning
Criteria Based on Benefits
(Value Proposition Canvas)
Reasoning
Criteria Based on Features
(Value Proposition Canvas)
Reasoning
Criteria Based on Cost and Revenue model
(Value Proposition Canvas)
Reasoning
Criteria Based on Physical Aspects
(Value Proposition Canvas)
Reasoning
Criteria Based on Usability
Ease of use, portability, setup time, learning curve etc.
Reasoning
Criteria Based on Feasibility (technical)
Availability of technology, complexity, durability, reliability, power use, etc
Reasoning
Criteria Based on Viability (financial)
What can customers pay, can we make it and sell it for the desired price?
Reasoning
Criteria Based on Environment (DEPEST)
Like social, environmental, ethical, cultural and legislative issues.
Reasoning

Priority Design Criteria

Priority Design CriteriaTask from ReasoningWeight 1 to 10 points
1
Task;
1pt - 10pt
2
Task;
3
Task;
4
Task;
5
Task;
6
Task;
7
Task;
8
Task;
9
Task;
10
Task;

Pretotype Phase (Lower Fidelity Experience):

Build; Test, Measure & Validate (Diverge)

  • As a team choose the best pretotyping solution for the information needed to validate. This would be a lower fidelity to test and bring faster results to non plausible ideas forward. I tend to start here to encourage a 'lean' practice before investing further time and resource.

Pretotyping Techniques

TestFunction
Fake Door
Test the Initial Level of Interest (ILI) in a yet-to-be-developed product or service by creating artefacts that suggest that the product exists and it’s available to see if people would buy it.
Facade
Test the Initial Level of Interest (ILI) in an existing but not yet broadly available/scalable product or service by creating artefacts that suggest greater availability (or scale.)
Pinocchio
Create a non-operational version of your product and use your imagination to pretend that it actually works to see if and/or how you would use it.
Mechanical Turk
Before making a major investment in designing and building a complex mechanism or back-end, consider using human skills to simulate the desired outcome.
YouTube
Through the “magic of movies” you can make products that don’t yet exist come to life and see how people react to them: Are they intrigued? Interested? Will they sign up to learn more or, better yet, commit to buy?
Provincial
Before committing to launch a new product or service formally and publicly on a large scale, test it in a smaller, more private and informal context to see if people are interested in it.
One-night Stand
Offer a pretotype version of you product or service on a very limited time basis to see if there is any interest before making any any long-term commitments.
Infiltrator
Take advantage of the customer traffic in an existing store (brickand-mortar or online) to stick an artefact of your idea (it could be a one off, even an empty box) on the shelves to see if people would buy it.
Impostor
Use an existing product or service as a starting point for your new product. Most new products or services are not completely new and different from existing ones. Many times there are other products and services that are close enough and, with some work, can be used to impersonate the new product you have in mind.
MVP
Create a first iteration of your product with the absolute minimum set of features that would make it valuable and useful–at least to early adopters.
The “Wizard of Oz” MVP
This MVP is where you essentially put up a front that gives your potential customers the impression you have a real working product and they’re experiencing the real thing. This MPV requires a lot more time and effort but it’s a very effective way of checking if you have a desirable product or service, before you build it.
The “Concierge” MVP
A concierge MVP is often confused with the “Wizard of Oz”. However, rather than using a human resource to replicate an algorithm, the customer knows they are receiving a human service.
The “Piecemeal” MVP
Falls in-between the “Concierge” MVP and the “Wizard of Oz” MVP. With a Piecemeal MVP, you use existing tools and services to deliver a functioning product to your customers.
Single Featured MVP
Often it’s more effective testing just one essential feature of a product. A single featured Minimum Viable Product prevents users from getting distracted by other features and allows you to gain a really clear understanding of one specific problem or solution.
MVP (Higher Fidelity Experience):

Test, Measure & Iterate (Diverge)

  • Create an actual working model of your product, website, app or software;
  • Create a mock-up or wire model of your product, website, app or software;
  • Create drawings or pictures of your product, website, app or software;
  • Create a presentation or animation of your service, product, website, app or software;
  • Create a movie of your service, product, website, app or software;
  • Create a website for your service, product, website, app or software;
  • Create a flyer or leaflet of your service, product, website, app or software;
  • Create a life show or pitch of your service, product, website, app or software;
  • formulate critical path to success
  • formulate critical assumptions
  • test prototype to check assumptions
  • repeat step 2 and 3 when necessary
Build, Launch, Measure & Iterate Phase:

Build; Test, Measure & Validate (Converge)

  • Launch once validated assumptions as closely as possible followed by iteration cycles.

James Rivera-Velez