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PM Lifecycle & Framework

Part 1: Kickstarting

Part 2: Strategy

Part 3: Discovery

Part 4: Design

Part 5: Development

Part 6: Measurement

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Part 1: Kickstarting

Exercise #1: Choose Your Product (10 minutes)

Product NameIf it’s a new product idea, add a placeholder name
What does it do?
Briefly describe what value your product provides
Where is it available?
Through what channels is it/will it be available ?
Photo(s)
If available, add photos of the product

Exercise #2: What kind of Product Manager will you be? Highlight your choice (5 minutes)

NameBusiness PMTech PMData PM AI PMDesign PMGrowth PM
Education
MBA - BBA - BComm
MSc - BSc - BEng
MDS - MMath - BSc - BEng - BPhys
MDes - BDes -BA - BPsych
MBA -BBA
Background
Marketing - Consulting - Sales - Analyst - Founder
Front-end - Back-end - Full Stack - Architect
Analyst - Data Scientist - Data Engineer
UI/UX Designer - Interaction Designer
Analyst - Marketing - Consulting
Strengths
Sees big picture
Tech savvy
Analytical
Customer empathy
Clear focus
Weaknesses
Not tech savvy
Role confusion
High failure rate
Not multi-tasker
No full ownership

Exercise #3: Create a Product Vision Board (15 minutes)

Vision: Explain your product in 1 phrase or statement.TagsColumnColumn 1
Target Group:
Needs:
Product:
Business Goals:
Who are the target users of your product?
What is the problem you’re trying to solve?
Top 5 - 10 features you want to offer
Who are your competitors?
Who are the target customers?
Which goal(s) do you want to achieve?
What are the alternatives for your product?

Exercise #4: The Feature Audit - Product (15 minutes)

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Exercise #4: The Feature Audit - Product (15 minutes)

NameTags
Kill it;
Admit defeat, and start to remove it from your product
Grow Adoption;
Get more people to use it
Improve it;
Make it quantifiably better for those who use it
Grow Usage;
Get people to use it more often

Part 2: Strategy

Exercise #5: Problem Space Definition (20 minutes)

GoalsThe High Level GoalColumnColumn 1Column 2
1st Level Goal
The High Level Goal
2nd Level Goal
Goal 1
Goal 2
Goal 3
Goal 4
Outcome 1
Outcome 1
Outcome 1
Outcome 1
Outcome 2
Outcome 2
Outcome 2
Outcome 2
Outcome 3
Outcome 3
Outcome 3
Outcome 3
Reframed Goal
Goal 1 Reframed
Goal 2 Reframed
Goal 3 Reframed
Outcome 1
Outcome 1
Outcome 1

Exercise #6: Product Strategy Grid (30 mins)

Customer BenefitCompetitor 1Competitor 2Your Product
Benefit 1; Must Haves
Y/N
Y/N
Y/N
Performance benefit 1;
Low / Med / High
Low / Med / High
Low / Med / High
Performance benefit 2;
Low / Med / High
Low / Med / High
Low / Med / High
Performance benefit 3;
Low / Med / High
Low / Med / High
Low / Med / High
Performance benefit 4;
Low / Med / High
Low / Med / High
Low / Med / High
Performance benefit 5;
Low / Med / High
Low / Med / High
Low / Med / High
Delighter's benefit 6;
Y/N
Y/N
Y/N
Delighter's benefit 7;
Y/N
Y/N
Y/N

a. Evaluate 4 apps on your phone in terms of problem size vs frequency and price vs cost.

Exercise #7: Problem Type Analysis (30 mins)

CompanyCompany TypeSize vs FrequencyPrice vs Cost
Company #1
B2B / B2C
e.g Big + Frequent
e.g High Price + High Touch
Company #2
B2B / B2C
e.g. Big + Infrequent
e.g Low Touch + Low Price
Company #3
B2B / B2C
e.g. Small + Frequent
e.g High Touch + High Price
Company #4
B2B / B2C
e.g. Big + Infrequent
e.g Low Touch + High Price

b. Evaluate your product’s problem space.

I. Problem Size vs Frequency (Highlight selection)

NameTags
Big + Frequent
Small + Frequent
Big + Rare
Small + Rare

II. Price vs Cost

NameTags
High Price + Low Touch
High Price + High Touch
Low Price + Low Touch
Low Price + High Touch

Exercise #8: Expressing Your Problem Timelessly (10 mins)

Problem StatementWhat's Wrong With it?
I want to swap phone numbers via Bluetooth with people nearby
I want to swap phone numbers via Bluetooth with people nearby
I want to learn product management on Udemy
I want to learn product management on Udemy
I want to hire a car on-demand
I want to hire a car on-demand
I want to send emails automatically when users achieve certain milestones in my web app
I want to send emails automatically when users achieve certain milestones in my web app

b) Is your Product Vision Statement timeless?

Your product vision statement.

Is there a technology dependency? Yes / No Is there a vendor dependency? Yes / No

a) Are these markets going to grow, shrink or stay stable in the next 5 years?

Exercise #9: Are you in a growing market? (10 mins)

MarketExampleGrow, Shrink, or Stable?Rationale
A password manager
Lastpass, Onepass
Shrink
Biometrics, Zero login, Implanted microchips, Brain passwords
Appointment scheduling for dentists
Zocdoc, Healthengine
Grow
Aging population Hard to automate
Virus protection for desktops
Norton, McAfee
Shrink
Desktop market is shrinking
Marketplace for second hand cars
Cars.com, Carmax
Stable
Market is saturated

b) Is your products market going to grow, shrink or stay stable in the next 5 years?

Exercise #9: Are you in a growing market? (10 mins)

MarketProduct NameGrow, Shrink, or Stable?Rationale
Describe your market
Product Name
Grow / Shrink / Stable
+ Positive influence 1 + Positive influence 2 - Negative influence 1 - Negative influence 2

Exercise #10: Practice Creating OKRs (20 mins)

OKRsTagsColumnColumn 1
Example 1:
Example 2:
Example 3:
Example 4:
O: Objective 1 KR1: Key Result 1 KR2: Key Result 2 KR3: Key Result 3 (Moonshot)
O: Objective 2 KR1: Key Result 1 KR3: Key Result 2 (Moonshot) KR3: Key Result 3
O: Objective 3 KR1: Key Result 1 KR2: Key Result 2 KR3: Key Result 3
O:Objective 4 KR1: Key Result 1 KR2: Key Result 2 KR3: Key Result 3

Exercise #12: Build Your Ideas Backlog(30 mins)

The IdeaKey Result ImpactedRisky AssumptionsUser Type / Persona
Idea #1
+ Key Result Positively Impacted - Key Result Negatively Impacted
1. Risky Assumption 1 2. Risky Assumption 2
Consolidate UX team
Idea #2
+ Key Result Positively Impacted - Key Result Negatively Impacted
1. Risky Assumption 1 2. Risky Assumption 2
Consolidate UX team
Idea #3
+ Key Result Positively Impacted - Key Result Negatively Impacted
1. Risky Assumption 1 2. Risky Assumption 2
Consolidate UX team

Exercise #13: Create Your Business Model Canvas (1 hour)

NameTags
Key Partners:
List the partners that you can’t do business without
Cost Structure:
List your top costs by looking at activities and resources.
Key Activities:
What do you do every day to create and deliver value?
Key Resources:
The people, knowledge, means, and money you need to run your business.
Value Proposition:
What are your products and services? What is the job you get done for your customer?
Revenue Streams:
List your top three revenue streams. If you do things for free, add them, here too.
Customer Relationship:
Channels:
How do you communicate with your customer? How do you deliver the value proposition?
Customer Segments:
List the top three segments. Look for the segments that provide the most revenue.

Exercise #14: Evaluate your ideas (30 mins)

The IdeaRisk?ReversibleAction
Idea #1
Low / Medium / High - Usability: Describe Risk
Yes / No
Validate / Do It
Idea #2
Low / Medium / High - Usability: Describe Risk
Yes / No
Validate / Do It
Idea #3
Low / Medium / High - Usability: Describe Risk
Yes / No
Validate / Do It

Exercise #15: Build Your Agile Roadmap (1 - 2 hours)

TIME FRAMENowNextSomedayColumn
GOALS_The outcomes we are seeking
1. Goal 1 2. Goal 2 3. Goal 3
1. Goal 1 2. Goal 2 3. Goal 3
1. Goal 1 2. Goal 2 3. Goal 3
CANDIDATES_The initiatives to deliver the outcomes
1. Initiative for Goal 1 2. Initiative for Goal 1 3. Initiative for Goal 2 4. Initiative for Goal 2 7. Initiative for Goal 3 8. Initiative for Goal 3
1. Initiative for Goal 1 2. Initiative for Goal 1 3. Initiative for Goal 2 4. Initiative for Goal 2 7. Initiative for Goal 3 8. Initiative for Goal 3
1. Initiative for Goal 1 2. Initiative for Goal 1 3. Initiative for Goal 2 4. Initiative for Goal 2 7. Initiative for Goal 3 8. Initiative for Goal 3
KEY RESULTS_The metrics to determine if the goal has been achieved
1. Key Result for Goal 1 2. Key Result for Goal 1 3. Key Result for Goal 2 4. Key Result for Goal 2 5. Key Result for Goal 3 6. Key Result for Goal 3
1. Key Result for Goal 1 2. Key Result for Goal 1 3. Key Result for Goal 2 4. Key Result for Goal 2 5. Key Result for Goal 3 6. Key Result for Goal 3
1. Key Result for Goal 1 2. Key Result for Goal 1 3. Key Result for Goal 2 4. Key Result for Goal 2 5. Key Result for Goal 3 6. Key Result for Goal 3

Part 3: Discovery

Exercise #16: Calculate Your ICE Scores (20 mins)

The IdeaThe RisksAlignResearchIdeateCreateValidateRefineICE Score
Idea 1
Medium - Value: Describe Risk - Viability: Describe Risk
Low / Medium / High
Low / Medium / High
Low / Medium / High
Low / Medium / High
Low / Medium / High
Low / Medium / High
10/50
Idea 2
Low - Usability: Describe Risk - Viability: Describe Risk
Low / Medium / High
Low / Medium / High
Low / Medium / High
Low / Medium / High
Low / Medium / High
Low / Medium / High
15/50

ICE Score = Impact (1-10) + Confidence (1-10) + Effort (1-10) (1 = worst score, 10 = best score).

Exercise #17: Create a user persona prototype (60 mins)

1. Define Assumptions2. Gather Data3. Analyze DataCreate Persona
Assumption 1 Assumption 2 Assumption 3 Assumption 4
Method (qualitative) Method (quantitative)
Create a prototype persona using XD, FIGMA etc.

Exercise #18 Add “Experiment Loops”to Ideas Backlog

The IdeaKey Result ImpactedRisky AssumptionsUser Persona
Choose my driver
+ Key Result 1 - Key Result 2 - Moonshot 1
1) Assumption 1 2) Assumption 2 3) Assumption 3 4) Assumption 4 5) Assumption 5
Experiment 1
Experiment 2
Experiment 3
Experiment 4

Untitled

Experiment TypeDescriptionRisks Evaluated:Learning:Decision:
Risk #1 Risk #2
Learning #1 Learning #2
Decision Taken
Risk #1 Risk #2
Learning #1 Learning #2
Decision Taken
Risk #1 Risk #2
Learning #1 Learning #2
Decision Taken

Exercise #18b: Lets conduct a (quick & dirty) contextual inquiry (3 - 4 hours)

Contextual inquiries are a technique widely used in user experience research. These semi-structured sessions revolve around a one-to-one interaction between the researcher and the user and are conducted in the environment where the user typically works or accesses the system in question.

The researcher observes users completing tasks and takes note where there are points of 😬 distress or ☺️ delight!

These types of interviews are a blend of observation and dialogue. They allow the UX researcher to examine the physical setting and assess specific product usage as it relates to location, environment, and surroundings.

Part 1: Inquiry Preparation (Get templates & examples here)

  1. Get Material: You’ll need the following: 1) Pen 2) Notebook 3) Camera & 4) Interview guide.
  2. Recruit Participant: Find someone who fits the profile of your “User Persona” (created in exercise #17) and uses your selected product. To simplify things, consider someone you know e.g. family, friends or colleagues. Get recruitment script here
  3. Create Agenda: See example here
  4. Schedule Interview: Schedule to interview them at the location where they’ll use your product.
    1. Share agenda.
    2. Get consent to take photos
  5. Create Interview Guide: See example here

Get Swag: Small thank you present for participant

Part 2: Conducting the Interview

  1. Aim to relax them with small talk so they act as natural as possible
  2. Establish rapport and trust with questions like
    1. How long have you been with the company?
    2. How long have you been using this product?
    3. How long have you been in this role?
    4. What aspect of your job do you like the most?

  1. Legalities - Normally a Non Disclosure Agreement (NDA) is signed. You can skip this part.
  2. Questions - The interview should be driven by the participant’s work and process, and not a pre-arranged script of questions. You can keep a cheat sheet (the Interview Guide), but let the conversation flow naturally.
  3. Wrap Up - this phase involves the researcher retelling their observations and conclusions to the user and allowing the user to have input into clearing up any misconceptions or to enlarge on important points

Part 3: Sharing your findings

Package your findings with suitable design assets like: blueprint, customer journey, day in life, etc. that can help you to present your results in an understandable way to your stakeholders. In this final package, please make sure to add all the photos and video you have taken.

Part 4: Design

Exercise #19: Critically examine a design (30 mins)

Identify a poor design you used recently. How would you improve it?

Untitled

NamePhotoThe IssuePossible Solutions
Product Name
Briefly describe the issue, explaining why you don’t like the design
Fix #1 Fix #2

Exercise #20: Crazy 8’s sketching (1 hour)

A4 White Paper, Black Marker, Timer

Step 2: Define users goal using a user story format.

As a <type of user>, I want <some goal> so that <some reason>

Choose driver:

As a <type of user>

I want <some goal>so that <some reason>

Step 3: Draw out task flow

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Task Flows

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Screenshots showing Crazy 8 area of focus in Task Flow

Step 4: Sketch 8 Ideas in 8 Minutes

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Crazy 8 sketches

Exercise #21: Lets create a Balsamiq wireframe(30 mins)

💡

WIreframes

Exercise #22: Examples of Skeuomorphism (10 mins)

Try to find 1 example of a Skeuomorphic design in your house e.g. check in your fridge.

Photo; Description of Skeuomorphism

The story; Skeuomorphism origin story

Part 5: Development

Exercise #23: Create a user story map (1 - 2 hours)

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Exercise #24: Lets practice writing user stories (30 mins)

Step 1: Pick 2 stories from the user story map created in exercise #23, and expand it out using the following format.

“As a ____, I would like to ____ in order to ____”.

Story 1: As a ____, I would like to ____ in order to ____

Story 2: As a ____, I would like to ____ in order to ____

Step 2: Add acceptance criteria to each story.

Step 2: Add acceptance criteria to each story.

Story 1: Acceptance Criteria

  • Acceptance Criteria #1
  • Acceptance Criteria #2
  • Acceptance Criteria #3

Story 2: Acceptance Criteria

  • Acceptance Criteria #1
  • Acceptance Criteria #2
  • Acceptance Criteria #3

Exercise #25: Create a Sprint goal (30 mins)

PRODUCTSPRINT NUMBERGOALUSER STORIES_1-6

Exercise #26: The Sprint Retrospective (15 mins)

What Worked WellWhat Didn’tActions
Item #1
Item #2
Item #3

Part 6: Measurement

Product Vanity Metrics

Step 1: Find 3 examples of vanity metrics for your product or feature idea. Step 2: Find a more suitable actionable metric.

Exercise #27: Vanity Metrics (20 mins)

Step 1: Vanity MetricStep 2: Alternative Actionable Metrics
Metric #1: Why it doesn’t work
Alternative metric #1 Alternative metric #2 Alternative metric #3 Alternative metric #4
Metric #2: Why it doesn’t work
Alternative metric #1 Alternative metric #2 Alternative metric #3 Alternative metric #4
Metric #3: Why it doesn’t work
Alternative metric #1 Alternative metric #2 Alternative metric #3 Alternative metric #4

Step 1: Identify the “One Metric That Matters” for your product / feature idea. Step 2: Explain why it matters.

Exercise #28: Find Your OMTM (15 mins)

The MetricDescriptionWhy Does It Matter?
Metric:
Description of Metric
Explain why this metric is the one your product should care about most i.e tie it to your goal